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The #1 Ticket Broker Guide: Ticket Broker Blueprint

by Brandon

ticketbrokerblueprint

In the year 2014, the concert and sports ticket industry remains as strong as ever. Ticketmaster is selling billions of dollars in annual revenue, and thousands of Americans are looking to get a piece of the entertainment pie by becoming the middleman between Ticketmaster and fans looking to score great seats to their favorite events.

Over the past several years, Ticket Broker Blueprint, our best-selling ticket broker guide, has taught thousands of aspiring ticket brokers exactly how to break into this profitable industry. Readers have reported over $100,000 in annual profit, year after year, as a result of the techniques and lessons taught in our guide. Best of all, thousands have joined me in living the ticket broker lifestyle, which sure beats the regular 9-5 grind that so many find themselves a slave of. For many, ticket brokering has been their way out.

Let’s go through some of the benefits of being a ticket broker.

You Decide Your Income

At a regular 9-5 job, your income is determined by your professional credentials, your company, and the relationships you make while at work. All fair, but ticket brokers (and all other entrepreneurs alike) are able to structure their work life around their own desired income level. Here’s how it work.

Want to earn $100,000 a year? The math is simple. There are 12 months in the year, so you’ll need to take home $8333.33 per month to make this work. How much is $8333.33 exactly? Well, let’s say you stand to profit $200 from each pair of tickets you sell. In this scenario, you’ll need to sell 42 pairs of tickets each month to reach your goal. Let’s suppose you buy three pairs of tickets to each event you pull for. That’s 14 events per month.

This might seem impossible when you first get started, but as you mature as a ticket broker, you’ll begin to realize that there are dozens of profitable events going on sale every month, and all you need to do is get a piece of 15 events or so per month to make a very good living as a ticket broker.

You Decide Your Schedule

The biggest bummer of the standard 9-5 job is, well, the 9-5. You have no choice but to clock in at 9 and clock out at 5, give or take half an hour, at the most. Sometimes you’ll even be forced to stay at work late, which makes matters worse.

As a ticket broker, you largely dictate your own schedule. You’ll most likely still need to wake up before 9AM, but apart from that, the rest of the day is yours to spend as you please. You can decide to work from 9AM to 12PM, relax from 12PM to 8PM, and begin work again at 8PM until bed at 1AM. That gives you the entire day to spend as you please. Tell me a job that offers you the same freedom and I’ll line up for it right now.

You Decide Your Destiny

At a conventional job, you can be fired at moment’s notice and not have a Plan B to turn to. In other words, you are not in control of your own destiny. When you own your own business, you’re in control of your successes, of your failures, and of each and every step you take along the way. If you get the feeling that concerts are the future, you can drop your entire sports inventory and focus on concerts exclusively. If you think creating your own website is the way to go (thereby bypassing StubHub and eBay fees along the way), then you’re free to do so.

You’re in control. Not your boss or your co-workers. Just you.

Conclusion

The message I’m trying to get across to you is this: If you’ve ever been intrigued by ticket brokering but weren’t sure it was a profitable enough path to take a risk on, worry not. The competition is fierce, but with the right mindset and the right techniques, ticket brokering can be as profitable for you as is has been for thousands of everyday Americans.

Best of all, the entertainment industry ain’t goin’ nowhere. The money will keep flowing in this industry or a long time to come, and our guide will help you get a piece of it.

Good luck.

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